CDV of Medal of Honor Recipient Dr. Mary E. Walker – Abolitionist, Surgeon, POW, & more – SOLD

ONLY WOMAN EVER TO BE AWARDED THE MEDAL OF HONOR

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This CDV has excellent print quality, and just as excellent is the subject matter.

Mary E. Walker, M.D., an American abolitionist, army surgeon during the Civil War, alleged spy, and prisoner of war.

At the outbreak of the Civil War she volunteer her services as a surgeon at a hospital in Washington,D.C. when at that time women were considered unfit for army service.

Dr. Walker was captured by confederate forces shortly after she crossed enemy lines to treat wounded civilians, and was arrested and charged as a spy. For a short time she was a prisoner of war in Richmond, Va until she was exchanged for confederate prisoners.

After the war, she was awarded the Medal of Honor for her bravery.

She is the only woman to have be afforded this honor to date. It should be noted that her name was deleted from the MOH roll in 1917 (with 900 others) but was restored to the roll in 1977.

Dr. Walker was born in 1832 and was a writer and lecturer supporting the women’s suffrage movement until her death in 1919.

The image has no back mark, is in excellent condition, and certainly an important Civil War era image. Her name, no of her hand, appears on the reverse.

USPS First Class Mail  $4.00

 

 

Mary Edwards Walker (November 26, 1832 – February 21, 1919) was an American feminist, abolitionist, prohibitionist, alleged spy, prisoner of war and surgeon. As of 2016, she is the only woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor.[1]

In 1855, she earned her medical degree at Syracuse Medical College in New York, married and started a medical practice. She volunteered with the Union Army at the outbreak of the American Civil War and served as a surgeon at a temporary hospital in Washington, DC, even though at the time women and sectarian physicians were considered unfit for the Union Army Examining Board.[2] She was captured by Confederate forces after crossing enemy lines to treat wounded civilians and arrested as a spy. She was sent as a prisoner of war to Richmond, Virginia, until released in a prisoner exchange.

After the war, she was approved for the highest United States Armed Forces decoration for bravery, the Medal of Honor, for her efforts during the Civil War. She is the only woman to receive the medal and one of only eight civilians to receive it. Her name was deleted from the Army Medal of Honor Roll in 1917 (along with over 900 others); however it was restored in 1977. After the war, she was a writer and lecturer supporting the women’s suffrage movement until her death in 1919.

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